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Descriptive Essays 

 

Descriptive and expository essays, as well as compare/contrast and persuasive essays, are examples of distinct types of essays. Depending on the subject and goal of the essay, you can choose the type of essay you wish to write. Regardless of the style of essay, description as a writing approach can be employed to make a significant impression in all forms of essays, including narrative writing. A narrative descriptive essay, for instance, might mix narrative and descriptive writing features.

 

 

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What is a descriptive essay?

 

 

A descriptive essay is one in which you use sensory aspects such as sight, smell, sound, touch, and taste to describe a single event or subject. Descriptive writing is common in travel writing, poetry, short stories, and novels, although it is not limited to these genres. "Show, don't tell" is a good rule of thumb in descriptive writing. In Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita, phrases like "Her skin shimmering in the neon light streaming from the paved court through the slots in the blind, her soot-black lashes matted, her grave gray eyes more vacuous than ever" demonstrate the power of description. While this example is from a novel in which the narrator describes a character, if you want to write an essay about a person, a descriptive essay is a good format to explore. When writing a descriptive essay about a person, you can include specifics such as how the individual appears and what he or she is wearing, as well as sensory details like scent, touch, and sound.

A successful descriptive essay recreates the event so that the reader can participate in it as well. It frequently depicts a single event or subject and conveys a strong impression. As a result, the first stage in writing a descriptive essay is to choose a prevailing impression. Consider the following questions: What kind of impact did a place or person leave on you? Was it a depressing atmosphere? Was there a feeling of unease? A dismal mood can be established by describing the filth, musty odor, light, or lack thereof – such as the summer sun hesitantly entering the room, dead colors, a draft too exhausted to ruffle up goosebumps, or the faint buzz of a flickering light bulb. On the other hand, portraying shallow breathing, restless foot-tapping, tightened jaws, fingers worrying about a loose shirt button, and flashing eyes might induce anxiety.

Sensory language is used to elicit an experience or to vividly depict an object. While there is a general bias for visual language, you can build a better picture by using all of your senses. You can describe what you saw, heard, smelled, tasted, and felt by describing what you saw, heard, tasted, and felt. Consider the following scenario: a mewing black cat with soft fur and stale breath, as well as the vile recollection of a sour salmon supper.

Certain tactics, such as naming, comparing, and specifying, are also employed to make descriptive essays more powerful. Naming entails identifying what has been observed. You might find a fireplace, a table, a bookshelf, a chair, a cat, and drapes in a study. The named things become more particular when they are detailed. For example, a mewing cat, a redwood antique table, mint-green draperies with sunflowers that hadn't seen the sun in a long time. The comparison uses literary devices such as metaphors and similes to make a stronger impression. The study, for example, resembled a vanished forest from another era. The sort of description is significant in addition to language, senses, and procedures. There are two types of descriptive essays: objective and subjective. In writing that does not contain emotions, such as a marine biologist's essay on the state of coral reefs, objective descriptions are utilized. Subjective descriptions are more personal, such as your first scuba diving experience. It's essentially your viewpoint. The tone of your essay is determined by your approach - subjective or objective. A subjective description seems more personal, but an objective description sounds more intellectual. "The corals, without the algae that offer them their color and nutrition, are now white," an objective description may say, whereas a subjective description might read, "I was caught in the midst of a rush of colorful reef fish and the deafening sounds underwater."

 

 

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Descriptive Essay Examples

 

  • Descriptive Essay: Amusement Parks

 

  • Descriptive Essay: Descriptive Writing

 

  • Descriptive Essay: My Camping Trip

 

  • Descriptive Essay: Beach Hacks

 

  • Descriptive Essay: My Racing Heart

 

  • Descriptive Essay About Climate Change

 

  • Descriptive Essay: Central Park

 

  • Descriptive Essay on Basketball Gym

 

  • Descriptive Essay: ‘ The Darkness Of The Night ‘

 

  • Descriptive Essay: ‘ Candy ‘

 

 

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How to write a descriptive essay

 

 

Identifying the thesis or primary argument is one of the first tasks in creating a descriptive essay. You can then construct the essay with clarity if you have a clear understanding of the key point. In descriptive essays, the thesis would be the overarching impression that you wish to convey throughout the paper. The next step is to determine whether your essay's goal is to inform or elicit an emotional response. You can use an objective description to inform people. A subjective description is ideal if the goal is to elicit emotions.

Once you've decided on a thesis statement and a purpose, you may begin prewriting to figure out what facts you'd like to communicate with your reader, as well as sensory details that expand on the prevailing impression you'd like to replicate in your essay. After you've decided on the topics you'd like to cover, you can start organizing it. The body paragraphs might be structured in a spatial (how things relate to one another or in physical placements), emphatic (the most important information comes first), or chronological order (follows the order of events). You may alternatively organize the essay by sensory perception, with each body paragraph devoted to a different sense. Each body paragraph should begin with a topic sentence, followed by evidence, and a concluding sentence that ties together the paragraph's focus, as in all academic writings. To ensure that the essay is cohesive and flows well, transition words should be used.

After you've established the structure and outline for your essay, you should focus on the language and sentence structure. The language in a descriptive essay must be rich in sensory description. Metaphors and similes can help to make your essay sound more vivid, but you must be careful not to utilize overused or popular parallels. Adverbs detract from the quality of writing and should be avoided. Verbs, sentence diversity in terms of length and structure, and the use of active voice, on the other hand, are successful. Finally, you can polish your essay and make it legible by using a review checklist that includes grammar checking. Examining essay samples and personal descriptive essay samples will assist you if you are unsure how to begin writing the essay. Reading a descriptive essay for college students or descriptive essay examples for high school students may be beneficial. Many descriptive essay sample pdfs may be found on 123HelpME. You can begin writing your own descriptive essay once you have a good understanding of how one is composed. The time you spend reading these articles can inspire you to write a descriptive essay. If you're still stumped, read through the list of good descriptive essay themes below or search for grade-specific essays like descriptive essay topics for grade 10.

 

 

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Descriptive essay outline template

 

 

You can use the descriptive essay outline below to assist you in writing a descriptive essay. An introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion make up a standard five-paragraph essay.

 

I. Introduction

 

a. Hook: It should grab the reader's interest and persuade them to continue reading. An inquiry, an interesting fact or statistic, or a quote could be the starting point. The hook should be relevant to the essay's purpose. A solid hook is also one that stands out from the crowd.

b. Background/context: It informs the reader about the essay's topic and establishes the tone. However, it must be broad. That is, it gives the essay's outline without giving everything away too quickly. It is also an opportunity to acquaint the reader with the context, as they may not be aware of it.

c. Thesis statement: It concentrates on the key idea and aim of your essay. It expresses precisely what the essay will be about. A successful thesis statement has a key point and supporting evidence that clearly defines the essay's focus, emphasis, and scope.

 

Body Paragraph 1

 

a. Topic sentence: This is the paragraph's main point in relation to the thesis statement's supporting points. It is necessary to introduce a new concept or notion. The signposts of your essay can be thought of as topic sentences. It assists you in organizing your paragraphs and giving your essay structure.

b. Evidence: It consists of details that back up the allegations presented. Sensory nuances are included in descriptive essays. Each sentence should relate to the paragraph's main theme, which is identified in the topic sentence.

c. The last sentence of the body paragraph is the conclusion. It connects to the topic phrase and transitions to the next theme to keep the essay moving smoothly from one body paragraph to the next.

 

Body Paragraph 2

 

a. Topic sentence: This is the paragraph's main point in relation to the thesis statement's supporting points. It is necessary to introduce a new concept or notion. The signposts of your essay can be thought of as topic sentences. It assists you in organizing your paragraphs and giving your essay structure.

b. Evidence: This section offers details that back up the allegations made. It also incorporates sensory information in descriptive compositions. Each sentence should relate to the paragraph's main theme, which is identified in the topic sentence.

c. The last sentence of the body paragraph is the conclusion. It connects to the topic phrase and transitions to the next theme to keep the essay moving smoothly from one body paragraph to the next.

 

Body Paragraph 3

 

a. Topic sentence: This is the paragraph's main point in relation to the thesis statement's supporting points. It is necessary to introduce a new concept or notion. The signposts of your essay can be thought of as topic sentences. It assists you in organizing your paragraphs and giving your essay structure.

b. Evidence: This section offers details that back up the allegations made. Sensory nuances are included in descriptive essays. Each sentence should relate to the paragraph's main theme, which is identified in the topic sentence.

c. The last sentence of the body paragraph is the conclusion. It connects to the topic phrase and transitions to the next theme to keep the essay moving smoothly from one body paragraph to the next.

 

Conclusion

 

a. Reflect: This section evaluates what the essay has revealed to you thus far, as well as any insights obtained. These could be revelations or provocative insights that come at the end of all you've said so far in the essay. At this stage, however, no new ideas should be offered.

b. Reinforce: It restates the thesis statement and revisits the primary topics presented. It is more efficient to synthesize rather than recap the arguments, which means that instead of repeating the same points, you should show how they fit together.

c. Concluding statement: This is the last sentence of the essay and the final paragraph, and it must be powerful. Depending on the goal of your essay, it should leave the reader with a strong impression, a question to consider, or ideas to pursue further.

 

 

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Popular Descriptive Essay Topics

 

If you are looking for good descriptive essay topics and descriptive essay ideas, these are a few popular ones you could consider.

 

  • Your favorite place or holiday
  • Your pet
  • Your best friend or favorite person
  • A concert you attended
  • Your dream
  • The house where you grew up
  • Describe yourself
  • An object that is special to you
  • Your favorite food
  • Your happiest memory

 

 

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